Columbia Grammar & Preparatory School

Private, day, college-prep school in New York, New York, United States
   Athletics conferenceNYSAISAA
PSAAMascotLeo The LionTeam nameLionsAccreditationAffiliationsNew York InterschoolWebsitewww.cgps.org
4 West 93rd

Columbia Grammar & Preparatory School ("Columbia Grammar", "Columbia Prep", "CGPS", "Columbia") is the oldest nonsectarian independent school in New York City, located on the Upper West Side of Manhattan (5 West 93rd Street). The school serves grades Pre-kindergarten to 12 and offers a college preparatory curriculum.

It was founded in 1764 by what is now Columbia University to teach future freshmen English, Greek, and Latin grammar.[1] The school was originally called The Grammar School of King's College, after the original name of Columbia University. When the college changed its name during the American Revolution, so did the school, to Columbia Grammar School.

The school dissolved its formal ties with Columbia in 1865.[2] The word "preparatory" was added in 1969.

The school has existed in several locations. In 1907, the school moved to its current location on 93rd Street, off Central Park West. Originally consisting of one building, it added five brownstones through its 1956 merger with the adjacent Leonard School for Girls. A building across the street was built in 1984, followed by two more in 1997 and 2001. An administration building was added to the school in 2009. In the past 20 years[when?], the size of the graduating class has more than doubled from about 45 to about 125.

History

The school was founded in 1764 by the 10-year-old King's College as a preparatory school.[1] It ran for 100 years under the direct auspices of the college.

One of the most illustrious headmasters during that period was Charles Anthon, one of America's earliest and most distinguished classical scholars. During his tenure, the Grammar School provided over half the students to Columbia College's freshman class.

In 1864, when Anthon retired as headmaster, the trustees of Columbia College ended their relationship with the Grammar School and the school became a proprietary institution.[2] It would gain nonprofit status in 1941.[3]

In 1937, the Leonard School for Girls was founded, using several interconnected brownstones on West 94th Street (now part of the lower school). The school joined with the Grammar School in 1956 to become a coed institution.[4]

Richard J. Soghoian, who became the school's 13th headmaster in 1981, guided the physical expansion of the school from its 1906 home at 5 West 93rd Street to the present complex, which totals 215,000 square feet (20,000 m2) with 14 buildings between 92nd and 94th streets. Soghoian retired in 2017.[5]

In 2017, William Donohue was headmaster, Sarah McLean was the Grammar School director (a predecessor, Stanley Seidman, retired in 2010), Paul Baly was the Middle School director, and Joanie Dean was the Prep School director.

Accreditation

Columbia Grammar & Preparatory School is a fully independent, non-sectarian school governed by a board of trustees composed of alumni and parents. The school is accredited by the New York State Association of Independent Schools, the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools, and the New York State Board of Regents.

The school is a member of the Independent School Admissions Association of Greater New York (ISAAGNY).[6]

Campus

5 West 93rd Street
94th Street Brownstones

In 1984, the school built a new Preparatory School at 4 West 93rd, containing a full-sized gymnasium, three science labs, state-of-the art computer lab, library, three music studios, and nine classrooms.

Columbia Grammar & Preparatory School greatly expanded its physical plant after 1985. Three new buildings and a fully renovated brownstone have, together with the existing buildings, added academic facilities as well as two new theaters, several computer labs, a variety of art studios and space for a growing music program. The Grammar School is located in a series of five interconnecting brownstones on 94th Street just off Central Park, and the 1905 Columbia Grammar School building at 5 West 93rd Street. In addition to classrooms, these house two libraries, two art studios, a gymnasium, swimming pool, two music studios, a science lab, a computer lab, and the Grammar School cafeteria.[7]

In 1996, 36 West 93rd Street was completed, adding 42,500 square feet (3,950 m2) of space to the physical plant. This building, which goes through from 93rd to 92nd Street, has two computer labs, five art studios, library, science labs, and classrooms for grades 5 and 6, a fully equipped theater, and a large cafeteria.

In September 2001, the school added five classrooms, another full-sized gym, a state-of-the-art theater, and three floors of classrooms and science labs.[8]

Since then, many brownstones have been added, one entirely for offices, and one building dedicated to the arts. A walkway has been built behind the multiple brownstones to make them easier to navigate. In 2009, CGPS purchased several new brownstones, one entirely for the kindergarten, another for a science building, and one for administrative offices. The Prep School also added a new level to its library.

The new CGPS Middle School opened its doors to students in grades 5, 6 and 7 on Thursday, September 8, 2016. Two floors were added to the existing 36 West 93rd Street building to create a 6th and 7th floor solely for these grades, while the remainder of the building has been renovated. The ground floor now features an expansive yoga and dance studio; the existing Prep School cafeteria has been renovated and a second floor cafeteria was added specifically for Middle School students. New art studios as well as a new library, three science labs, a rooftop play yard and twelve classrooms have been added to the building. The HVAC system has been updated and the building is fully handicap-accessible.

Headmasters

  • Matthew Cushing (1764–1772)[9]
  • Alexander Leslie (1772–1776)[9]
  • William Cochran (1784–1788)[9]
  • Joseph Nelson (1788–1828)[9]
  • John D. Ogilby (1828–1830)[9]
  • Dr. Charles Anthon (1830–1864)[9]
  • George W. Bacon (1864–1869)[9]
  • Richard S. Bacon (1864–1892)[9]
  • Benjamin H. Campbell (1869–1920)[9]
  • George A. Kohut (1920–1933)[9]
  • Frederic A. Alden (1920–1956), Headmaster emeritus (1956–1964)[9]
  • James W. Stern (1956–1980)
  • Dr. Richard Soghoian (1981–2017)
  • Dr. William Donohue (2018–present)

Athletic championships

Columbia Prep athletics teams participate in the New York City Athletic League (NYCAL).

Cross Country

  • Boys League Championships: 1991, 2009, 2010, 2013, 2014, 2015
  • Girls League Championships: 1991, 1994, 1995, 2005, 2008, 2009, 2017

Soccer

  • Boys League Championships: 1987, 1991, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012
  • Boys League Tournament Championships: 1997, 2002, 2005, 2009, 2010, 2012
  • Girls League Championships: 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018
  • Girls League Tournament Championships: 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018

Tennis

  • Boys League Championships: 2004, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2013, 2014, 2016
  • Boys League Tournament Championships: 2003, 2004, 2006, 2009, 2010, 2014, 2015, 2016
  • Girls League Championships: 1988, 1990, 1993, 2017
  • Girls League Tournament Champions: 2016, 2017

Volleyball

  • League Championships: 1992, 2000, 2003, 2011, 2015
  • League Tournament Championships: 2011

Basketball

  • Boys League Championships: 1990, 1995, 1997, 2001, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2016, 2020
  • Boys League Tournament Championships: 1995, 1997, 2001, 2006, 2010, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
  • Girls League Championships: 1988, 1994, 2001, 2012, 2016, 2017, 2018
  • Girls League Tournament Championships: 1995, 2001, 2015, 2016, 2018

Ice Hockey

  • Boys League Championships: 2016
  • Boys League Tournament Championships: 2012, 2016, 2017

Swimming

  • Boys League Championships: 2017, 2018, 2019
  • Boys League Tournament Championships: 2017, 2019
  • Girls League Championships: 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2017
  • Girls League Tournament Championships: 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016

Baseball

  • League Championships: 1988, 1989, 1990, 1992, 1993, 1996, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2016, 2017
  • League Tournament Championships: 1988, 1989, 1990, 1992, 1993, 2005, 2006, 2008 2012, 2013, 2014

Golf

  • League Championships: 2001, 2004, 2009, 2010, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018
  • Tournament Championships: 2004, 2010, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016

Softball

  • League Championships: 1997, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2006, 2013, 2017, 2018
  • Tournament Championships: 2004, 2017, 2018

Track & Field

  • Boys League Championships: 1990, 1991, 2007, 2010, 2011, 2014, 2018, 2019
  • Girls League Championships: 2001, 2002, 2011

Graduation requirements

In order for a student to graduate from CGPS, the following requirements must be fulfilled between 9th and 12th grades:

  • 8 semesters of English (Students must take at least one course in American Literature, World Literature, and Pre-Twentieth Century Literature during their junior and senior years)
  • 8 semesters of History
  • 6 semesters of Mathematics
  • 6 semesters of Science
  • 6 semesters of World Language
  • 6 semesters of Physical Education
  • 1 semester of Art
  • 1 semester of Arts History (Students can choose between the following courses: Western Art History, Global Art History, Music History, and The History of American Musical Theater)
  • 1 semester of Technology

Students must also complete 60 hours of Community Service.

Notable alumni

Notable teachers

  • Joel Benjamin – Chess grandmaster and 3 time U.S. Chess Champion. U.S. Open champion in 1985.[28]
  • Henry Churchill de Mille – Businessman and theater actor and playwright.
  • Albert Field – Famous Dalí archivist.[29]
  • Fiorello H. La Guardia – 99th Mayor of New York City and 4-term Congressman.
  • Andrew Lippa – Author and theater composer, lyricist, performer, and producer.[citation needed]
  • Michael Rohde – U.S. chess grandmaster and attorney at law. U.S. Open champion in 1991.[30]
  • Marvin Terban – Children's book author.[31]
  • Marvin Vincent – Presbyterian minister and professor of classics and New Testament exegesis and criticism.[32]

References

  1. ^ a b Sullivan, McDonald and Dixon, Ross, Columbia Grammar School 1764–1964: A Historical Log. 1965, p. 1.
  2. ^ a b Sullivan, McDonald and Dixon, Ross, Columbia Grammar School 1764–1964: A Historical Log. 1965, p. 31.
  3. ^ Sullivan, McDonald and Dixon, Ross, "Columbia Grammar School 1764–1964, A Historical Log". 1965, p. 52
  4. ^ "History | Columbia Grammar & Preparatory School". www.cgps.org. Archived from the original on 2019-07-11. Retrieved 2019-07-11.
  5. ^ Goldman, Victoria, "The Manhattan Family Guide to Private Schools, 6th Edition", Soho Press, 2010, p. 187
  6. ^ "Independent School Admission Association of Greater New York: School & Affiliates Directory". Archived from the original on 2013-01-06. Retrieved 2013-02-17.
  7. ^ "Our Campus | Columbia Grammar and Preparatory School". Archived from the original on 2011-10-30. Retrieved 2011-11-02.
  8. ^ "Our Campus" Archived 2011-10-30 at the Wayback Machine – Columbia Grammar & Preparatory School website
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Sullivan, McDonald and Dixon, Ross, "Columbia Grammar School 1764–1964, A Historical Log". 1965, p. 10
  10. ^ "Richard Adler obituary". The Guardian. 22 June 2012. Retrieved 16 September 2021.
  11. ^ Vicary, Elizabeth (18 December 2008). ""See, there was this bird..." Grade Nationals 2008". The United States Chess Federation. Retrieved 16 September 2021.
  12. ^ Chess Life, Volume 62, Issues 1-6, p. 9 (2007)
  13. ^ "Family tree of John Vernou". Geneanet.
  14. ^ "How Did I Get Here? Peter Gelb". Bloomberg.com – via www.bloomberg.com.
  15. ^ "Harry Guggenheim Dead; Newsday Founder Was 80". The New York Times. January 23, 1971.
  16. ^ Sullivan, McDonald and Dixon, Ross, "Columbia Grammar School 1764–1964, A Historical Log". 1965, p. 40
  17. ^ "Sam A. Lewisohn, 1884–1951". Stamford, Conn. : The Overbrook Press. July 11, 1951 – via Internet Archive.
  18. ^ Sullivan, McDonald and Dixon, Ross, "Columbia Grammar School 1764–1964, A Historical Log". 1965, p. 8
  19. ^ Victoria Schneps (23 December 2021). "Power Women with Victoria Schneps" (Podcast). Schneps Media. Event occurs at 4:10-4:25. Retrieved 1 January 2022.
  20. ^ Menze, Jill, "The Postelles Go Indie for Long-Delayed Debut Album", Billboard magazine, June 10, 2011
  21. ^ "Ruppert Park Highlights : NYC Parks". www.nycgovparks.org.
  22. ^ "Stephen Shore Biography, Life & Quotes". The Art Story.
  23. ^ "Alumni Highlights | Columbia Grammar & Preparatory School". www.cgps.org.
  24. ^ Sullivan, McDonald and Dixon, Ross, "Columbia Grammar School 1764–1964, A Historical Log". 1965, p. 19
  25. ^ Rosman, Katherine; Bernstein, Jacob (15 December 2020). "The Undoing of Jeffrey Toobin". The New York Times. Retrieved 16 September 2021.
  26. ^ "Dwight TOWNSEND, Congress, NY". InfoPlease.
  27. ^ "Eugene Paul Ullman Roughton Gallery". www.roughtongalleries.com.
  28. ^ "The United States Chess Federation – "See, there was this bird..." Grade Nationals 2008". www.uschess.org.
  29. ^ Martin, Douglas (August 10, 2003). "Albert Field Is Dead at 86; Archivist of Dalís and Fakes". The New York Times.
  30. ^ "Giving Back With Chess: Charity Chess Champs Set for May 21". US Chess. April 27, 2017.
  31. ^ "Fensterheim '76 Visits Professor Terban | Columbia Grammar & Preparatory School". www.cgps.org.
  32. ^ https://www.amazon.com/monster-higher-critic-Marvin-Vincent-ebook/dp/B01M1AXCY7[dead link]

External links

  • Official website
  • v
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Buildings
59th–72nd Sts
72nd–86th Sts
86th–110th Sts
Former
Culture
Shops, restaurants
Museums
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Lincoln Center
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Green spaces/recreation
Education
Primary and secondary
Post-secondary
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Religion
Churches, chapels
Synagogues
Transportation
Subway stations
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  • 72nd Street/Central Park West
  • 72nd Street/Broadway
  • 79th Street
  • 81st Street–Museum of Natural History
  • 86th Street/Central Park West
  • 86th Street/Broadway
  • 96th Street/Central Park West
  • 96th Street/Broadway
  • 103rd Street/Central Park West
  • 103rd Street/Broadway
  • Cathedral Parkway–110th Street/Central Park West
  • Cathedral Parkway–110th Street/Broadway
Streets
  • 66th Street
  • 72nd Street
  • 74th Street
  • 79th Street
  • 85th Street
  • 89th Street
  • 95th Street
  • 96th Street
  • Amsterdam Avenue
  • Broadway
  • Central Park West
  • Columbus Avenue
  • Columbus Circle
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